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2-D Chess Players Take on a 3-D Chess Master (Part of my Trump Persuasion Series) - Dilbert Blog

2-D Chess Players Take on a 3-D Chess Master (Part of my Trump Persuasion Series)

Republicans have narrowed down their strategy options for destroying Trump. They started by creating a list of all the possible strategies that anyone could imagine. Then they eliminated all of options that were certain to work. In the next phase they eliminated all of the options that might work. What was left is four options that absolutely will not work. And that’s what they are going with. The people who compiled this list of strategies are the folks who want to run the country.

If you have been reading my series on Trump and his linguistic kill shots, you will see no persuasion skill whatsoever in the Republican plans for “reframing” Trump. 

On a related point, you probably saw some news yesterday about Mark Cuban saying he could beat any of the presidential candidates if he were to run for president. That’s how you test the public’s reaction to a Trump/Cuban ticket. Cuban can’t say he would make a great vice president. It is smarter to say he would make a great president. Let the voters decide that Cuban needs 4-8 years of seasoning before he is ready. That way the public can own the “decision” he is putting in their heads.

If the media and the polls react favorably to Cuban’s statements about running for president, it opens the door for him to be on Trump’s ticket later. So this is just a test balloon. And that is the normal way these things are done. The VP (or potential VP in this case) is the trial-balloon person. That is a basic game plan in politics. I’m not sure the public knows that.

And one assumes Cuban and Trump and talking, via Cuban’s confidential app, Dust.

Bill Maher is cranking up the outragism on the left to try and derail Trump. Maher’s association with the Huffington Post eliminates any shred of credibility he once had, but he still gets a lot of attention. Apparently the racism argument against Trump is largely based on one poorly-formed sentence he uttered that one time. Some observers interpreted the sentence to mean Trump was saying Mexicans are (mostly?) rapists. People who are not in cognitive dissonance figured it was just his usual exaggerated style of speaking.

Personally, I would start worrying about Trump’s racism if his tens-of-millions of opponents can find somewhere in his vast history of public comments at least one more vague sentence that sort of somewhat bothers someone when seen out of context. It must be there. Keep looking, Bill! You got the Huffington Post on your side! Together you will rule the irrelevant issues!