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Call it Phase II of Capitalism - Dilbert Blog

Call it Phase II of Capitalism

In yesterday’s blog I imagined a future where capitalism morphs into something with freedom of employment but more restrictions on how individuals can spend, invest, and buy health care. The point of the restrictions would be to keep gullible idiots from destroying the entire economy, again, through their own reckless behavior.

Most of the comments fell into two camps:

1. Capitalism is fine the way it is.

2. People would never stand for those new restrictions.

Some people also assumed I was recommending new restrictions on freedoms. I’m not. I’m predicting the restrictions because it will become clear that the alternatives are impractical. And as always, it is just a thought experiment. Don’t take it too seriously.

First let’s look at the notion that capitalism is fine and we’re experiencing nothing more than another recession. I don’t think that’s the case this time for several reasons. The biggest reason is the baby boomer generation that is retiring and poised to absorb all social security and health care resources while adding little in productivity. And by the way, they didn’t save enough money to retire. Next you have the Kazillion dollars in debt, and another tsunami of mortgage defaults that will trigger over the next few years as rates automatically adjust upward according to contract.

Meanwhile I see no obvious candidate for an economic driver to the upside. Apple can only sell so many iPhones.

Unwise debt and unsustainable bubbles had masked the fact that the economy was already bankrupt. The next mortgage meltdown (unavoidable), and the baby boomer impact (unavoidable) are not balanced out by anything that looks like good news. In other words, capitalism Part 1 failed.

The second objection to yesterday’s post is that people wouldn’t put up with any additional curbs on their spending and investing freedoms. That seems ridiculous to me since we already put up with so many societal restrictions. A few more would hardly be noticed. I don’t remember the last time I heard anyone grumble about seatbelts. And if the government told banks they couldn’t make billion-dollar loans to the homeless, no one would complain about that new restriction on freedom. Some restrictions on freedom just make sense.

Suppose your so-called restrictions on freedom came down to this question: “Would you rather have affordable healthcare or the right to make ignorant and risky investments?” Or how about, “Would you like to have a job or the right to be obese without being taxed extra?”

I don’t know what capitalism’s second act will look like, but it probably involves preventing individuals from being as self-destructive as they would prefer.

I remind you that I lean libertarian, so I’m happy to let anyone engage in risky and morally ambiguous behavior, but only up to the point where it has an impact on me. When your behavior raises my taxes it becomes my business.