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The Upside of the Recession - Dilbert Blog

The Upside of the Recession

I don’t know about you, but I have totally stopped worrying about terrorist attacks. Now I’m only afraid of bankers with new ideas. I’m not joking about either point.

Gas is a lot cheaper lately. That doesn’t help you much if you’re unemployed and can’t afford a car, but for the lucky people with jobs, it helps a lot. No one saw that coming a year ago.

America is feeling a lot less arrogant and a lot more humble lately. If you believe the experts, that should go a long way toward helping International relations.

Traffic isn’t so bad, bargains abound, and even the lines seem shorter.

For the half of the country who wanted Obama as President, the economic woes sealed his victory. If he’s half the savior his supporters believe, something good will happen soon. I just hope it isn’t the Rapture.

As painful as this recession is likely to become, everyone agrees that sometimes you have to shake the rug to get all the crap out of it. Economies don’t grow in straight lines.

It’s expensive to travel anywhere, but on the other hand, the new season of 24 is almost here. I don’t need to go to faraway places and meet people when I can sit on my couch and watch Jack Bauer shoot those people.

I remember driving home in 1989 and thinking I had a flat tire because the car went all wobbly. I pulled over and discovered that my tires were fine; the earth was moving. It was the Loma Prieta Earthquake, and I soon discovered my apartment in shambles. But a funny thing happened. All of my neighbors were outside, stunned. We talked. We shared stories. We bonded. It was a strangely good time. And I felt connected to people at a deeper level than ever before. Shared disaster does that.

No one wants the economy to crumble. But having a reason to love your neighbor a litter better doesn’t suck. If we can feed everyone – and I think we can – things will be fine. And as I have said here before, some kid in a garage has already figured a way out of this.