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Fixing the World - Dilbert Blog

Fixing the World

I often see problems in the world and wonder why someone doesn’t fix them. Then I realize that I am someone, and that makes me feel bad because it is all my fault. Obviously I can’t fix every problem, but I decided to try and fix one in particular.

The majority of voters say the ailing economy is the most important problem for the next U.S. president to solve. How does a voter who knows little or nothing about economics decide which candidate has the best economic plan?

As you know, the media is worthless in solving this problem because they like to give equal time to both sides, no matter how ridiculous one of the sides might be. Or worse, some media outlets make no attempt to be unbiased. Realistically, the media has no idea which economic plans are likely to work best, so even if they wanted to be objective and informative they don’t have the tools or the incentive to acquire them.

The economy is arguably the most important issue in the world, having a huge impact on everything from global warming, to health care, to defense. And voters have no reliable information upon which to make decisions. Someone needs to fix that. Realizing that I am someone, I decided to take a crack at it.

At substantial personal expense I hired a professional survey company to poll professional economists and find out which presidential candidate’s plans have the most support. Obviously there is a limit to how unbiased the survey can be, since economists are human, and most of them presumably belong to a major political party. We’ll try to take that into account with the survey design. But no matter what the result, I think it will be useful.

For example, the idea of a gas tax holiday was condemned by economists in both major parties. I expect there are other plans that have virtually no support from economists in either camp. That would be useful to know.

But suppose economists are evenly divided on a particular tax plan. Is that useful to voters? I think it is, because the only rational thing for you to do as a voter in that situation is to support the plan that taxes yourself the least. And you can do that with a clear conscience if there is no agreement among experts that taxing yourself more will help the world in the long run.

I think we would all agree that having better information won’t influence most voters. If every economist in the survey somehow miraculously supported the same candidate’s positions, it wouldn’t change the votes of hardcore Democrats or Republicans. But in a close election such as this one, independent voters, who I call the Rational Few, end up making the decision. I am hopeful that for that influential group, better information will lead to better decisions. If the Rational Few are indeed influenced by a poll of economists, and it tips the election, economists will forever be polled before national elections. Problem solved.

And in this way I plan to fix the economy, end the energy crisis, rationally address global warming, and provide low cost health care to all. In return, I expect the public to call me an idiot. I’m pretty sure that’s why “somone” doesn’t fix problems more often. But I can take it.

The survey will take several weeks to pull together. I’ll give you the results when they are in.

On a separate note, I probably won’t post an entry until later this week. I’ll tell you what I’m up to later. It’s not a vacation, but it is a good thing.